Mirror neurons – A tough act for a non-copywriter to follow

| January 20, 2011

Vilayanur S. Ramachandran, the well-loved superstar neuroscientist, discovered something really special about our brains.

He found mirror neurons. They’re brain cells that act in exactly the same way whether you’re performing an action yourself or watching someone else do it.

What are mirror neurons?

Mirror neurons give humans a rich and detailed, hyper-realistic flavour of each others’ interior landscapes. Deeper than empathy, it’s communication at a cellular level, allocentric rather than egocentric. They’re powerful stuff. So much so that Ramachandran says mirror neurons could even be responsible for the evolutionary “dawn of self awareness”.

Sadly, when you communicate in writing you lose that richness. English is fantastically flexible and creative. But at the end of the day language is just words. You can’t reproduce the complex, DNA-deep, mirror neurone-generated empathy, contextual texture and emotional depth you get from a visual encounter whether it’s over Skype, on video or face to face.

Can you do it? If not, let me at it!

One more good reason why it’s wise to squeeze every bit of value out of your written communications by bringing a freelance copywriter on board. A good writer will appreciate the challenges presented by distance selling. They’ll use every trick in the book to bond emotionally and intellectually with readers – on all sorts of levels – to persuade them to buy.

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Category: copywriting and marketing

By Kate Goldstone - ()

Originally from Middlesbrough, I lived in Brighton for many years before moving to North Devon. I’ve had a passion for words all my life and this is my twelfth year as a freelance writer. In my spare time I draw, paint, sculpt, carve wood and rock, garden, read, write poetry and enjoy long distance hiking. I sing and play the recorder. I collect modernist paintings, vintage rugs and mid-century German art pottery. I’m a member of The Poetry Society. And I am an experienced volunteer shepherd, a ‘Lookerer’.

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