Tweeting, consistency and being ‘you’

| September 19, 2012

Some clever person Tweets something magnificently silly, interesting, relevant or just downright hilarious. You reply. They reply back. It’s a match made in networking heaven… most of the time.

Twitter is a brilliant forum for banter. So it’s disappointing when the person on the other end of a conversation clearly isn’t the same individual who crafted the original Tweet. The original is witty and erudite, the response is dull as ditchwater. They’re obviously not the same person.

Are you tweeting as yourself or as a corporate entity?

It’s understandable. It’s difficult tweeting when you’re busy. It makes sense for businesses to write Tweets then hand the interaction element to someone else. But it can be terribly inconsistent as far as your brand’s concerned. One minute you come across as a witty type with a canny turn of phrase, the next you’re incapable of creating witty repartee if your life depended on it.

The last thing a brand wants is to expose a split personality to a notoriously picky online world. Integrated marketing is the bunny. You need to use the same tone of voice across all your communications, social media included.

If you outsource your Twitter interactions, choose a Doppelganger who can adopt your communication style – your tone of voice – convincingly. And give them free reign to ‘be’ you instead of getting all farty when someone responds in kind to your irreverent and witty Tweets.

Tags: , , ,

Category: miscellaneous

By Kate Goldstone - ()

Originally from Middlesbrough, I lived in Brighton for many years before moving to North Devon. I’ve had a passion for words all my life and this is my twelfth year as a freelance writer. In my spare time I draw, paint, sculpt, carve wood and rock, garden, read, write poetry and enjoy long distance hiking. I sing and play the recorder. I collect modernist paintings, vintage rugs and mid-century German art pottery. I’m a member of The Poetry Society. And I am an experienced volunteer shepherd, a ‘Lookerer’.

Comments are closed.